Music Venue Trust launches ‘traffic light’ system to support the most in-need music venues

30 venues in the UK are on 'red alert' – at immediate risk of permanent closure

11.11.20

Words by: Felicity Martin

The Music Venue Trust has launched a new Traffic Light campaign, using the colour-coded system to demonstrate how at-risk venues are, and a map to highlight those in imminent danger.

The live music initiative has been active throughout the pandemic, trying to alert people to the huge difficulties facing the live sector.

The new campaign puts venues into three categories: those considered safe until 31st March (Green – 353 venues), those at risk of closure between now and 31st March without additional support (Amber – 273 venues) and those in imminent danger of permanent closure (Red – 30 venues).

The below map shows the 30 venues that are currently on red alert, and a Crowdfunder page has been launched where you can donate to those spaces.

CEO of Music Venue Trust Mark Davyd said: “What the #saveourvenues campaign has achieved during the last 8 months is truly remarkable. Thanks to the efforts of music fans, local communities and the wider music sector we have raised over £3m in donations and have unlocked over £80m in government assistance to help stave off the imminent closure of over 400 grassroots music venues. We are now focusing exclusively on those 30 remaining venues which face immediate permanent closure. If people want these local venues to still be there when this is over there is a very clear call to action: choose a venue, get donating, get writing, get calling, get organised. Save them all. Reopen Every Venue Safely.”

Yesterday it was announced that live music may return by Spring 2021, according to experts following the news of a Covid-19 vaccine which is reportedly 90% effective.

In recent months, industry figures have spoken out against the lack of live sector support in the UK. DJ Fat Tony appeared on Sky News to talk about the government’s lack of support for the nightlife industry amid the pandemic, while Carl Cox said the government was “100% wrong” over its live industry stance.