19.03.12

Words by: Charlie Jones

The 10 best kuduro tunes, according to BreY

London producer of loud, funny bass music BreY is finally releasing his superb EP ‘Brasil’ on Svetlana. You should listen to it here, buy it through Boomkat. Anyway, BreY has Angolan blood in his veins, and wanted to tell us about kuduro music, which comes from Angola.

Kuduro is a genre of music originating from Luanda, Angola and not out of the European blogosphere. If you where to take what crunk music was in the US and ship it over to Angola, add a dash of afro-Latin percussion, give it a dance music twist and present its MC with a new complimentary set of balls…that’s what you’re in for, a hard ass ride. That’s Kuduro, at least the Kuduro that I grew up on.

The style emerged in the early 80s, with 4/4 electronic beats being layered over traditional Lusophonic and Caribbean samples. I could probably sprinkle a couple lies in here and let you all think I’m some sort of Kuduro cognoscenti and go through its history since the 80s but I was born in the 90s, and with the 90s came teenage rebellion in the provinces of Angola, all it took was a microphone to spearhead the next wave of Kuduro rebellion amongst the masses with poster boys of the genre such as Sebem and Doggy Murras popping up, left right and center to take advantage of this new music. You say grime, I say Kuduro. Now there’s a thought, first person to get D Double E on a Kuduro batida gets my applause and not much more. Rebellion is a funny little thing.

1) Batida – Bazuka (Quem me Rusgou)
2) Os Lambas – Comboio II (DJ Znobia remix)
3) Bruno M – Eh Ewe
4) Cabo Snoop – Prakatatumba
5) Agre G – Pike Pike
6) Sebem – Felicidade
7) Titica – Chao Chao
8) Bruno M – Danca dos Comba
9) Doggy Murras – Aqui Tas
10) Buraka Som Sistema – Kalemba (Wegue Wegue)