Artwork for Redshape and Motor.

Daniel Cookney's second installment reviewing recent artwork - a look at Redshape and Motor's abstract crimson cover's.

Intrinsically linked to the disparate sounds on the 3024 label that he co-runs with Martyn, Jeroen Erosie’s sleeves are unlike anything else. Culminating in a series that’s become so clearly visually defined that each could be mistaken for being a housebag rather than original, individual piece of artwork, the keen-eyed will notice the number of different collaged elements that distinguish a 12” from the likes of Mosca from another by Instra:mental or Addison Groove. The latest in 3024’s catalogue is Redshape’s ‘Throw In Dirt/The Land’ alongside another abstract cut-up composition of graffiti-like marks broken-up and occasionally obliterated by wide strokes of pure colour. In this particular case the dominant theme appears to take its cue from the producer’s name with its multi-layered yet carefully arranged crimson-heavy representation perhaps being a visual synonym for the two tracks.

Meanwhile a similar late night colour palette dominates the cover of Motor’s Man Made Machine that’s forthcoming on the Chris Liebing-owned CLRX sub-label. This long-player’s supporting cast (including Gary Numan, Martin L. Gore and Billie Ray Martin) might gain some column inches elsewhere, but it’s the ominous photography by Timothy Saccenti that’s notably moving Motor’s image away from the box marked industrial-goth-techno and towards a new, indefinable section of visual pairings (perhaps where it can sit next to Squarepusher’s equally creepy Shobaleader One opus, d’Demonstrator). And while Motor’s title might be leaning heavily towards Kraftwerk, the artwork avoids any reference to the retro-futurism of Dusseldorf’s finest and instead opts for something that is simply (and brilliantly) unsettling.

Plastic Circles

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