Comment: Vaporwave and the pop-art of the virtual plaza

Comment: Vaporwave and the pop-art of the virtual plaza

In the first of a two-part feature on the underground musicians co-opting the icons of hi-def capitalism for their own ends, Adam Harper charts the rise of business class lounge music and the selling of digital smoke.

This is the first of a two part feature. The second, on the movement’s darkside, can be found by clicking here. We hope you enjoy the read.

Global capitalism is nearly there. At the end of the world there will only be liquid advertisement and gaseous desire. Sublimated from our bodies, our untethered senses will endlessly ride escalators through pristine artificial environments, more and less than human, drugged-up and drugged down, catalysed, consuming and consumed by a relentlessly rich economy of sensory information, valued by the pixel. The Virtual Plaza welcomes you, and you will welcome it too.

This is the world broadcast in brutal high-definition by a new faction within underground art-pop that’s exploring the technological and commercial frontiers of 21st-century hyper-capitalism’s grimmest artistic sensibilities. Wearing manic caffeine grins or concealed enigmatically behind corporate muscle and mirror-shades (or both), musicians such as Fatima Al Qadiri, James Ferraro, Gatekeeper, INTERNET CLUB, New Dreams Ltd. and many more are performing the next step in techno-capitalism’s disturbing and disturbingly logical sequence. They let flow the music that lubricates Capital, open the door to a monstrously alienating sublime, twist dystopia into utopia and vice versa, and dare you not to like it.

Is it a critique of capitalism or a capitulation to it? Both and neither. These musicians can be read as sarcastic anti-capitalists revealing the lies and slippages of modern techno-culture and its representations, or as its willing facilitators, shivering with delight upon each new wave of delicious sound. We could apply to their music a term used to describe a certain sentiment and praxis that has recently gained currency among philosophers of capitalism: accelerationism. Accelerationism is the notion that the dissolution of civilisation wrought by capitalism should not and cannot be resisted, but rather must be pushed faster and farther towards the insanity and anarchically fluid violence that is its ultimate conclusion, either because this is liberating, because it causes a revolution, or because destruction is the only logical answer. It sporadically found voice in the work of twentieth-century continental philosophers François Lyotard, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari but was explored most thoroughly and alarmingly by the British philosopher Nick Land during the 1990s. With William Gibson’s cyberpunk fiction and Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz among his reference points, Land’s heady, nightmarish philosophy melted together scholarship and art into a staccato stream of penetrating and, in hindsight, disquietingly prescient tableaux. “Life is being phased-out into something new,” said Land in his 1992 essay ‘Circuitries’. “And if we think this can be stopped we are even more stupid than we seem.”

“Life is being phased-out into something new,” says philosopher Nick Land in a 1992 essay. “And if we think this can be stopped we are even more stupid than we seem.”

The anarcho-capitalist pop of these musicians, whether we hear it as ironic and satirical or as truly accelerationist, is something of a soundtrack to Land’s visions. Ferraro, who thinks we should ‘applaud’ the future rather than fear it, fired some of its first warning shots with his album ‘Far Side Virtual’. FSV and the ‘Condo Pets’ EP that preceded it pastiched techno-capitalist stock promotional music for the era of the personal computer and of bum-bags full of Apple devices, forcing us to confront the kitsch that’s used to make us excited about brands and their technological possibilities . But Ferraro soon morphed into something much weirder, more sinister and more sensual with his subsequent mixtapes as BEBETUNE$ and BODYGUARD. Meanwhile a small group of loosely related underground artists were converging on the same brutally affirmative territory as Ferraro but independently of him, clustered around the labels Hippos in Tanks, Beer on the Rug, UNO NYC and the New York-based art/fashion magazine Dis.

The movement could be described as ‘post-lo-fi’ and is often ‘post-retro’ too. Many of these musicians – such as Ferraro, Gatekeeper, Outer Limitz, INTERNET CLUB and New Dreams Ltd – started off in alignment with retro and/or lo-fi genres such as hypnagogic pop and chillwave, but have now ended that by doing exactly the opposite, exchanging their muffled glimpses of yesteryear for the present and the near future, glistening in cinematic HD. Where before they were half asleep or simply chilling, now they’re wide awake, their systems streaming with stimulants. Some acts, such as BODYGUARD, Fatima Al Qadiri, *E+E * Jam City are even venturing beyond pastiche and into a new, abstract and disorientating sensualism. Yet you could say that many of these artists are still situated within the world-view of the lo-fi underground, one in which an authentic, warm and grass-roots music-making is pitted against the top-down, cheesy, slick and impersonal technological mainstream. All these artists have done is underline the significance of this antagonism by caricaturing their cultural opponents. Perhaps since capitalism is so omnivorous with its co-optings and appropriations that defending the authentic no longer feels possible (Facebook bought Instagram, after all), accelerationist pop is lo-fi and avant-garde going on the offensive. This is clear from the context this music comes from – a saccharine chart-pop number by boyband HDBoyz sounds no different from ‘the real thing’, but then you learn that the band were featured in Dis magazine and that they performed at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Since capitalism is so omnivorous that defending the authentic no longer feels possible, accelerationist pop is lo-fi and avant-garde going on the offensive.

It’s also possible to think of this music as lo-fi and retro in a more roundabout way, as ultimately reminding us that even music at the extreme cutting edge of technological and cultural modernity is always already obsolete. Today’s HD is tomorrow’s lo-fi, and today’s ultra modern pop is tomorrow’s old skool. These musicians often hint at these grim inevitabilities and futilities. Up until ‘Far Side Virtual’, many of James Ferraro’s albums were impressionistic lo-fi portraits of bygone eras – perhaps on ‘Far Side Virtual’ he decided to represent the present as is and then let nature take its course, over time, and do the aging for him. Returning to it in ten or twenty years time, we might discover that it was ironically a victim of its own futurist acceleration, and is now about as up-to-date as a ten-year-old carton of milk.

This potentially accelerationist pop fills and creates the spaces in which the business of capitalism is conducted, be it the motivational seminar on innovation or the propaganda of representation, suffusing them with an artificially purposeful aura. It might once have been called muzak, or lounge, but the spaces it operates in are larger now, shinier, more connected, and more impersonal than the home. Today and tomorrow, capital lives everywhere, in our TVs, phones and minds, but nowhere is it more holy than in the gleaming temples of its interface with the public – the office lobby, the hotel reception area, and most of all, the shopping mall. This music belongs in the plaza, literal and metaphorical, real and imaginary – the public space that is the nexus of infinite social, cultural and financial transactions and the scene of their greatest activity and spectacle.

Or rather, the plaza was once a public, civic and communal space. These days the plaza is privately owned but the public can come and spend their money on the nice things there. The word now brings to mind a corporate-sponsored marble square between office blocks lined with Starbuckses and Prets and Yo Sushis, or a glittering premier hotel staffed with the prettiest serfs, or an enormous semi-underground cathedral of consumerism with a reverb that would out-do Notre Dame, were the sounds not absorbed by thronging shoppers. Central Plaza, Hong Kong, the Millennium Plaza Hotel, Dubai, the Pantip Plaza, Bangkok. And Times Square, New York, Cabot Place, London, Shibuya, Tokyo, Nanjing Road, Shanghai. In short, these are the places where the riot police clear away the tents of those calling for democracy, or will do one day soon.

As I see it, this notionally accelerationist zeitgeist in art-pop falls into two distinct branches, even if they’re thematically and genetically related on everything I’ve mentioned above. The first, represented by INTERNET CLUB, New Dreams Ltd. and a number of related artists on Beer on the Rug and elsewhere, has been called “vaporwave”, discussed below. I will look at the second branch – Fatima Al Qadiri, BEBETUNE$, BODYGUARD, Gatekeeper and others – in part two of this article.

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Its name crawling mysteriously out of blogs and Last FM tag clouds and familiar to many of those who make it, vaporwave is a next step in the evolution of hypnagogic pop. In many ways it’s the opposite of hypnagogic pop, but maybe it’s better to think of them as two ends of a continuum, parts of a spectrum. Hypnagogic pop and vaporwave both share a fetish for the trash music on either television or just somewhere in the background, by turns chipper and dreamy, and they both treat it through endless loops, drones and small-cell repetitions. Hypnagogic pop and vaporwave both like to manipulate their material to defamiliarise it and give it a sense of the uncanny, such as slowing it down and/or lowering the pitch, making it, as the term goes, ‘screwed’. Finally, hypnagogic pop and vaporwave both have an eerie tendency now and again to turn trash, something shallow and determinedly throwaway, into something sacred or mystical.

But then there are the differences. Where hypnagogic pop took the trash music of the 1970s and 1980s, vaporwave typically takes material from the early 1990s onwards that can pass for contemporary. Where hypnagogic was manifestly lo-fi, with tape hiss and muffled hi frequencies in the extreme, vaporwave is very often as crystal clear as a brand new entertainment system playing its demo disc. Where hypnagogic pop tracks were often long and induced a trance, vaporwave is made up of brief, cut-up sketches that just as often jolt you out of a trance as cause one. Where hypnagogic pop aimed at close pastiche but was nevertheless newly composed, vaporwave uses samples almost entirely, cutting out the middleman. Yet, characteristically, the line between hypnagogic pop and vaporwave is blurred. As I said, there’s a continuum between the two, and many examples of both styles are halfway along it. And of course, this continuum and these terms are just particular ways of looking at musical activity, one angle on its aesthetics. They’re just stylistic markers, vague patterns and alignments that we do or don’t observe, that always look different from different angles and scales.

The typical vaporwave track is a wholly synthesised or heavily processed chunk of corporate mood music, bright and earnest or slow and sultry, often beautiful, either looped out of sync and beyond the point of functionality or standing alone, and sometimes with a smattering of miasma about it. It’s made by mysterious and often nameless entities that lurk the internet, often behind a pseudo-corporate name or web façade, and whose music is typically free to download through Mediafire, Last FM, Soundcloud or Bandcamp. Occasionally vaporwave produces a material object, a cassette or CD-R decorated with internet-age and hi-fi-era pop art that both sickens and astonishes. The text surrounding vaporwave – the artist names and track titles – is almost entirely in declamatory, brutally attention-craving capital letters, and often employs Chinese and Japanese lettering whose inscrutably (to me and most other Westerners, at least) enhances the music’s sense of tapping into the airwaves of global techno-capitalism and overhearing its business as usual, meant for someone else. The typical vaporwave zip file (album, if you like) presents itself as a collection of inspiringly modern, motivational and mood-regulating settings – perfect for that infomercial, that menu screen, that in-flight safety video, that business park promotional video, that drinks reception in the lobby.

Why the name? Will Burnett, the north-east Texan and internet citizen behind INTERNET CLUB, says “a lot of music in the genre reminds me of fogged-out environments – places where everything is obfuscated and uncertain”, and adds that it’s “based on uncertainty and sometimes even dread”. Often the fog element is induced by some lo-fi effect such as screwing. But the significance of “vapour” doesn’t end there. It’s one letter away from, and strongly reminiscent of, the word ‘vaporware’, a derisory term for a software or hardware project undertaken by a tech company that is announced to the public but which, after much time passes, never actually comes to fruition. Such is the deferred and even tragic promise of fulfilment in vaporwave. But vaporware can also refer to the deliberate fabrication of future products, with no intention to eventually release them, so as to hold customers’ attention and appear to get to the next best thing before their rivals. Here the promises of capitalist advertising and PR become an outright fraud borne of the proclivities of the marketplace. Hence vaporwave as ‘selling smoke’.

Sublimation, a concept in psychoanalysis and aesthetics describing the transmutation of libidinal energy, is the name of the physical process that turns a solid into a gas. The name ‘vaporwave’ is also reminiscent of a famous passage from Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto, “all that is solid melts into air”, referring to the constant change society is subjected to under bourgeois capitalism. In context, the quote becomes part of an almost accelerationist credo touching on the inevitably of obsolescence, and echoes the vaporwave artists’ critique: “Constant revolutionising of production, uninterrupted disturbance of all social conditions, everlasting uncertainty and agitation distinguish the bourgeois epoch from all earlier ones. All fixed, fast-frozen relations, with their train of ancient and venerable prejudices and opinions, are swept away, all new-formed ones become antiquated before they can ossify. All that is solid melts into air, all that is holy is profaned, and man is at last compelled to face with sober senses his real conditions of life, and his relations with his kind.”

Will Burnett certainly hopes to reveal the true extent of the alienation of capitalist social relations, as represented by the corporate background music he drags into the light of attentive listening. I stumbled across his INTERNET CLUB persona as part of an epic trek through the digital wilds of Last FM and was quickly directed to an Angelfire page where his substantial back catalogue is free to download. It soon become apparent that he used other aliases too, and after tracking him through a bewildering series of Web 2.0 sites (behaviour we once considered the preserve of the stalker but is now the compulsion of the good internet consumer), I finally found an email address and was able to find out what sort of person makes vaporwave.

Over email, Burnett is a staunch anti-capitalist rather than an accelerationist per se. Referencing the French thinker associated the Situationist movement and involved in the aesthetics and ideology of the 1968 protests, he says that with INTERNET CLUB he wanted to do “something very Debordian, about how this capitalistic society has generated a dehumanizing hyperreality by focusing on infinite generation of ideals as shown through commodities. I view society as entering a hyperreal state, and how it has is part of what INTERNET CLUB is about.” IC tracks usually take stock music and music from corporate YouTube videos and degrade them somehow, with effects such as reverb, compression or glitchy looping, which achieves “the defamiliarisation of things we’ve become so use to that we don’t notice them any more”. Corporate culture, he summarises, has lead contemporary society to “deny justice in the name of appeasement and false promises”.

INTERNET CLUB (not the most inviting moniker, but it does the job with the requisite deliberate tactlessness), has zip albums called ‘MODERN BUSINESS COLLECTION’, ‘NEW MILLENNIUM CONCEPTS’ and ‘REDEFINING THE WORKPLACE’, and tracks called AS DREAMS GO BY, NEVER LOG OFF, TIPS AND TRICKS FOR THE NEW WEB MARKETER and, ominously, BREATHE IT IN. Before INTERNET CLUB, Burnett generated ultra lo-fi hauntological dustscapes as Datavis, name-checking tape composer Philip Jeck as an influence. Other side projects include the hypnagogic Datavision Ltd. (alongside Leonce Nelson, with whom he co-owns the tape label Hexagon Recordings), long-form lo-fi tape vaporwave as ECCO UNLIMITED and, as ░▒▓新しいデラックスライフ▓▒░ (in Roman letters, ‘Atarashi i Derakkusuraifu’, meaning roughly ‘Deluxe New Life’), a zip folder of spooky, crunched-up detritus apparently taken from Japanese television broadcasts called ‘▣世界から解放され▣’ (‘Freed from the world’) and that’s something of a tribute to Oneohtrix Point Never’s ‘Replica’ (“one of my favourite records ever,” says Burnett).

“Cyberspace. Here it comes. The terminal social signal blotted out by technofuck buzz from the desiring-machines. So much positive feedback fast-forward that speed converges with itself on the event horizon of an artificial time-extinction.” – Nick Land, ‘Machinic Desire’, 1993

Starting out as a hypnagogic label in early 2011 with acts following in the footsteps of Rangers and Matrix Metals, Beer on the Rug then inched along the continuum towards vaporwave on mini-albums from Boy Snacks and Midnight Television. But in July 2011 the hi-fi landed with NEW DREAMS LTD, a cassette full of high-end synthesiser studio jams for the Windows 95 era, decorated with beaming Far Eastern women, a rippling blue ocean and italicised Times New Roman. Another key player aligned with vaporwave, New Dreams Ltd. is the umbrella term for the many aliased, sample-based releases by an anonymous producer currently based in Portland, Oregon who had previously produced music in various locations between chillwave and vaporwave as Vektroid (*** The tumblr pages gathering them all together is here http://newdreamsltd.tumblr.com/). One side project is MACINTOSH PLUS, whose album ‘FLORAL SHOPPE’ features chopped, glitching and screwed adult contemporary soul alongside twinkling spa promotional tunes. As esc 不在 (‘esc fuzai’, the latter characters meaning ‘absence’) and New Dreams Limited Initiation Tape s/he often takes choice loops from adult contemporary pop of the eighties onward, exploring the territory of Oneohtrix Point Never’s renowned ‘Nobody Here’ loop.

The latest incarnation of New Dreams Ltd. is 情報デスクVIRTUAL, which in Roman letters is written ‘Jouhou Desuku VIRTUAL’, roughly meaning ‘Virtual Information Desk’. The album, released in April, is called ‘札幌コンテンポラリー’ meaning ‘Contemporary Sapporo’, a reference to the Japanese city, and its track titles are quite something to behold: ODYSSEUSこう岩寺「OUTDOOR MALL」 (the characters in the middle mean ‘granite temple’), HEALING 海岸で昼寝MY LAST TEARS (in the middle, ‘nap on the beach’), 3D崖の端 ∕ ‘‘B E Y O N D’‘ THE LIMIT (begins ‘3D Edge of a Cliff’) and the astonishing XX ‘‘RUBY DUSK ON A 2ND LIFE NUDE BEACH’‘ ☯ . . . の生活・・・「ロベルタ」 (‘… Of life… “Roberta”’). With aeroplanes and a flight attendant on the cover and track titles referencing malls, museums and hotels, the album seems to present itself as an aid to the tourism industry, but then are also references to sports cars, the internet, weed and pornography. The music on ‘Contemporary Sapporo’ is the most dead-pan vaporwave can get – sultry smooth jazz instrumentals and exotica from session musicians in the glossiest studios, ringing with E Pianos and other infinitely engineered synthesiser presets. And yet even here, the producer throws in the occasional moment of glitch or pitchbend to jolt the listener out of complacency, and to smash the glass.

Over email, the producer behind it all says, “New Dreams Ltd is entirely a caricature of mass media and its evolution in the late 80s right before computer culture blew up in America. I wanted to create some rift between reality and fiction because I feel like that’s exactly what they were trying to accomplish back then.” S/he elaborates: “It seems like the world has been slowly tuning out of reality for the last 20 years and that fascinates me. There is a big undertone of surrealism to everything that was going on at the time, especially in Japan, and I wanted to capture that in a way that would strike people now the way it did then. The lengths people went to in advertising, even then, is shocking to me, I think shock factor is a huge element of things like this.”

Does the term ‘vaporwave’ have any significance to her/his music? “I’ve heard the term used a lot but I don’t affiliate with it personally. When I started assembling the original LASERDISC VISIONS tape, we just called them eccojams – of course referencing Oneohtrix’s quintessential “Chuck Person” tape, the entire catalyst behind a lot of what we began doing. We had a pretty tight but private group of people working on it and none of us were concerned about it ever existing as a genre. Screw music has been around for ages now – we’ve just changed the context we see it within and the means by which we conceive it”. Upon further reflection and now that s/he wants to return to beat-making, s/he “would definitely put the New Dreams Ltd. projects in the “vaporwave” category, even if only incidentally”.

Along similar lines to Burnett, the producer “wanted LASERDISC VISIONS to sound alienated and otherworldly to anybody who heard it. I didn’t want it to sound too familiar. I wanted to take that familiarity and re-contextualize it so it was just slightly out of place.” Referring to the psychological effect that causes people to recoil from humanoid robots and other simulacra because they’re not quite human enough, s/he aims to achieve “an “uncanny valley” effect, so to speak”.

Yet New Dreams Ltd’s relationship to the music s/he samples is not quite one of straightforward critique. Though she describes her method of sampling as “conceptual”, “sarcastic” and “simplistic”, s/he continues with an interesting take on its capacity for self-expression: “What I hope people draw from my work is that it is sincere – I want people to feel my presence in what I make because it gives me the opportunity to never have to have a physical identity to accompany it.” On the political implications of using corporate stock music, s/he concludes enigmatically, “I think it’s very important that we as musicians react to our world. I guess part of me misses the era of protest songs. Now everything’s a protest song, now I feel like the most effective social commentary is the one without dialogue honestly”.

There are other vaporwave producers out in the digital wilderness too. Two particular highlights: the gorgeous E Piano heavens on Computer Dreams’s zip EP ‘Silk Road’ are so painfully alluring that you’ll never want to go home again. 骨架的 (‘Hone Ka Teki’ or ‘Rack of Bone’) has a zip EP, ‘Holograms’, which ably explores vaporwave’s spookier side in between righteous screwed contemporary soul loops. Based on similarities in the music and its mode of distribution, it’s crossed my mind that Computer Dreams and 骨架的 are actually the same person, but we might never know, and it doesn’t seem important really. The musicians behind the real corporate stock music, the real vaporwave, wherever they are, are never named, or seen – they’re anonymous craftsmen simply supplying a product that is pumped directly into the engine of global capitalism and eventually released as exhaust.

For a summary of the vaporwave sound featuring tracks by the artists discusses above, download or stream the mix:

00:00 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Into Dreams’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
00:35 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘TRANSPARENT’ from BEYOND THE ZONE
01:33 – Computer Dreams: ‘Track 2’ from Silk Road
02:36 – MACINTOSH PLUS: ‘待機’ from FLORAL SHOPPE
03:12 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘THE 1080P COLLECTION’ from WEBINAR
03:41 – 骨架的: ‘RELAX’ from Holograms
04:16 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘LASERDISC VISIONS’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
05:36 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘WAKE SLEEP I’ from NEW MILLENNIUM CONCEPTS
06:26 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘SHIFTING THE PARADIGM’ from WEBINAR
07:02 – 情報デスクVIRTUAL: ‘7 WONDERS OF THE iNTERNET FT WIND☯WS 97「GEOMETRIC HEADDRESS」’ from 札幌コンテンポラリー
08:34 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘WANDERING’ from MODERN BUSINESS COLLECTION
09:31 – MIDNIGHT TELEVISION: ‘Channel Surfing’ from MIDNIGHT TELEVISION
10:02 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘MENTHOL FEEL’ from BEYOND THE ZONE
11:08 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Data Dream’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
12:57 – Lasership Stereo: ‘Pole Position’ from Lumina
13:52 – esc 不在: ‘aurora3d’ from midi dungeon
14:24 – fuji grid TV: ‘warm life / legs’ from prism genesis
15:42 – 骨架的: ‘Silky Sheets’ from Holograms
16:34 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘RAINING ZONE II’ from NEW MILLENNIUM CONCEPTS
17:05 – 情報デスクVIRTUAL: ‘☆ANGELBIRTH☆’ from 札幌コンテンポラリー
18:09 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘THE SHARPER IMAGE’ from THE SHARPER IMAGE
19:18 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Mind Access’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
20:21 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘WEBINAR’ from WEBINAR
21:27 – Computer Dreams: ‘Track 5’ from Silk Road
22:13 – bitterTV: ‘last night with you’ from Soundcloud
23:19 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘PRODUCTIVITY SUITE’ from WEBINAR
24:13 – 情報デスクVIRTUAL: ‘’‘GEAR UP’‘ 4 FLIGHTシアトルズベスト’ from 札幌コンテンポラリー
25:21 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘WAVE TEMPLE’ from UNDERWATER MIRAGE
26:57 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Malls’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
28:51 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘OPTIMIZATION (#TRANCEFAMILY EPIC TECH REMIX) from WEBINAR
31:01 – esc 不在: ‘archway’ from black horse
32:29 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘OFFICE ONLINE’ from WEBINAR
33:40 – Computer Dreams: ‘Track 9’ from Silk Road
35:01 – fuji grid TV: ‘heaven’s gate / sneak out!’ from prism genesis
36:09 – 骨架的: ‘Breeze’ from Holograms
38:01 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Zik Zak’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
38:35 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘DON’T THINK LOVER’ from BEYOND THE ZONE
39:23 – Lasership Stereo: ‘Daytona’ from Lumina
40:00 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘JAZZY’ from BEYOND THE ZONE
40:32 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘ONLINE WORKSHOP’ from WEBINAR
41:37 – 骨架的: ‘Fountain’ from Holograms
42:53 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘IT PLAZA DUBAI’ from WEBINAR
43:48 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘ONE TRUE MEDIA’ from WEBINAR
44:34 – LASERDISC VISIONS: ‘Los Santos’ from NEW DREAMS LTD.
45:01 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘TRU FEELINGS’ from MODERN BUSINESS COLLECTION
46:10 – Lasership Stereo: ‘Plastics’ from Soft Season
46:56 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘GLOBES’ from DREAMS 3D
47:40 – esc 不在: ‘in a cave watching the blizzard’ from midi dungeon
48:30 – 骨架的: ‘Memory’ from Holograms
49:40 – MACINTOSH PLUS: ‘ECCOと悪寒ダイビング’ from FLORAL SHOPPE
50:43 – ░▒▓新しいデラックスライフ▓▒░:: ‘プロミセス「▣世界から解放され▣」’ from ▣世界から解放され▣
51:37 – 情報デスクVIRTUAL: ‘HB☯ PORN’ from 札幌コンテンポラリー
53:19 – esc 不在: ‘tonight on hbo’ from black horse
54:46 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘DRIFT II’ from DREAMS 3D
55:35 – new dreams ltd initiation tape: ‘camaro’ from part one
56:34 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘THE NEW DIGITAL FRONTIER’ from REDEFINING THE WORKPLACE
57:56 – INTERNET CLUB: ‘REDEFINING THE WORKPLACE’ from REDEFINING THE WORKPLACE

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